Sublette County Weed & Pest District
P.O. Box 729
12 S. Bench Rd.
Pinedale, WY 82941
Ph: (307) 367-4728
Fx: (307) 367-3313
Email: scwpoffice@gmail.com
Hours: 8 am - 4 pm

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Upcoming Events
06 May 2014
Join SCWP on May 6th at the Big Piney Senior Cent
See more

08 May 2014
Film will be showing at Pinedale Entertainment Cen
See more

Job Application

Now Accepting Applications for 2014 Seasonal Employment

If you are interested in seasonal employment at the Sublette County Weed & Pest, please fill out the following application and either email or return to the Weed & Pest office located at 12 South Bench Road in Pinedale, WY.

Download 2014 Job Application
2014 Coloring Contest

On the back, include the following: Name, Grade or Adult, Address, Phone Number
Ways to submit entries:
Mail to:
SCWP PO Box 729
Pinedale, WY 82941
OR Bring to:
SCWP Office
12 South Bench Road, Pinedale.
Deadline to receive entries is: July 17, 2014. Drop off at Fair Office: July 18, 2014 8:00a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Download Coloring Page Here

 

 

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Mission

Sublette County Weed and Pest has a mission to serve as responsible stewards of Sublette County by aiding in the protection and preservation of the land, water, and resources from the degrading impact of noxious weeds.

We believe that the prevention of noxious weeds is the best approach and may be achieved through full implementation of the State noxious weed law. To further this approach, we strive for increased public awareness through improved educational efforts.

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Why Should I Care?

Noxious weeds usually come from other continents, and are not native to the landscape. Sometimes referred to as ‘invasive plants’, these plants are aggressive, lack control, and out-compete native plants which leads to the destruction of habitat and forage.

Sportsman:

A healthy forest, and lush vegetation are required for elk, moose, deer, bighorn sheep, and antelope habitat. Meadows and aspen forests provide habitat for sage grouse, ruffed and blue grouse, ducks, and geese. River systems provide habitat for cutthroat tour species. These areas, however, can be quickly destroyed by invasive plants if left uncontrolled. Plants such as spotted knapweed can take over thousands of acres, reducing forage and habitat for game, leading to fewer licenses issued. Invasive plants such as salt cedar and purple loosestrife grow in shallow water, destroying trout habitat as well as increasing erosion on riverbanks.

Sportsman are required to bring only certified weed-free forage onto national forest lands to prevent introduction of noxious weeds. They can also help out by pulling invasive species when possible, and by reporting weeds to local agencies such as the BLM, Forest Service, and Weed & Pest District.

Ranchers:

Noxious weeds compete with native grasses, forage, and crops on rangeland and pasture. Noxious weeds also consume fertilizer and water, and can become very expensive to control over time. Some weeds such as leafy spurge, poison hemlock, houndstongue, and black henbane are even toxic to livestock.  Invasives often appear first on ditch banks and in fallow areas, and quick detection and control are the best option. State laws require landowners to control noxious weeds, and prevent further spread. Agencies such as the Sublette County Weed & Pest provide consulting on weed control, as well as reduced price herbicides and spray equipment.

Landowners:

Landowners sometimes do not notice noxious weeds on their property until they start choking out native vegetation. Noxious weeds are not only expensive to control, but an infestation can reduce the value of land.  Noxious weeds also increase soil erosion by displacing the native species that would normally hold soil in place and be able to withstand floods. These invasive plants are not part of the native landscape, and allowing them to flourish can cause permanent damage to land. The most cost effective way to manage weeds is with early detection and early eradication of small infestations. The Sublette County Weed & Pest, along with other local agencies, can identify suspicious plants, consult with you on noxious weed control, and even provide reduced price herbicides and lend out spraying equipment.